British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa
British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa
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Records: 1 to 11 of 11


Saturday, August 6
DNA Special Interest Group  (Special Interest Group)
9:30 am to 12:00 pm
Room 115, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
This meeting will feature a presentation by Bill Arthurs on the role of SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and STRs (short tandem repeats) analysis in genetic genealogy, followed by a round table sharing of the highlights and challenges of members' research in progress.
 
Members meet to share experiences, information and ideas and learn about the use of DNA evidence in exploring family history. Attendees will be required to sign in and out at the reception desk on the ground floor.
 
Visit the DNA Information, DNA Database Sites, and Special Interest Groups page for more information.



Friday, September 9 through Sunday, September 11
22nd Annual Family History Conference  (Conference)
Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa
Learn about Irish family history, DNA genealogy and more at our conference. Visit our Marketplace that is open to the public. More information is available in our Conference section...


Saturday, September 24
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Group)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Room 226, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. We all, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.
 
Visit the links page to find information about Scottish research.



Saturday, October 1
DNA Special Interest Group  (Special Interest Group)
9:30 am to 12:00 pm
Room 115, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
Members meet to share experiences, information and ideas and learn about the use of DNA evidence in exploring family history. Attendees will be required to sign in and out at the reception desk on the ground floor.
 
Visit the DNA Information, DNA Database Sites, and Special Interest Groups page for more information.


Saturday, October 8
Online Family Trees  (Before BIFHSGO Education Talk)
9:00 am to 9:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive Nepean, Ontario
By Lesley Anderson
Haven’t got your tree online yet? Do you want to have a research assistant help find historical records and matches in other member trees? If you are thinking about doing your DNA with Ancestry, having a well-developed tree will be a great benefit to confirm or refute your family history research so that you can connect with cousins and break down brick walls  Come early and get some tips and advice from our very own Ancestry expert – Lesley Anderson!
 
About the Speaker
Lesley Anderson's passion for genealogy has led to her teaching classes, researching for others, volunteering at the LDS Family History Library, speaking at conferences, working for Ancestry.ca as their Canadian spokesperson and hosting genealogy research and historical sightseeing tours. She was the impetus for the Before BIFHSGO sessions and was on the board for 4 years.


Saturday, October 8
Did Lucy and Isaac Actually Marry? And the Importance of Dying in the Right Sequence  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive
by Brian Laurie-Beaumont
After Henry Wimburn Sudell Sweetapple Horlock died in 2010, his widow turned to their executors to find a relative to inherit family portraits spanning 350 years. Most of the paintings were of the Webb family of Gloucestershire. The story was Wimburn and his sister were the last of their Horlock line, which had married into the Webbs generations ago. Problem was there was no evidence their Horlocks had married those Webbs. Plus half the portraits were not named or dated, so were they all really related. The search was on to prove the family relationships both among the portraits and to find third, fourth or even more distant cousins related to the portraits and alive today. In steps the genealogist. Oh, this also involves the loss of a wife’s fortune and a vicar suspected of double homicide.
 
About the Speaker
Brian Laurie-Beaumont became involved in genealogy only in 2011, inspired by the need to preserve family connections across “the pond” after the passing of his wife’s grandmother and mother. Since then, he spends an average of 25 hours a week studying and researching. He is also a member of the NEGHS and the NYBGS with research accounts at Ancestry, Family Search, Findmypast, and Scotland’s People. Research trips include Normandy, England, Wales, New England plus visits to the Society of Genealogists Library in London, The Family History Center in Salt Lake City, and the NEGHS library in Boston. He has also attended Who Do You Think You Are? in London and RootsTech/FGS in Salt Lake City. Brian is now studying with the National Institute for Genealogical Studies to acquire his post-nominal in genealogy. And he spends far too much on genealogy books.
 


Saturday, October 22
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Group)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Room 228, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. We all, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.
 
Visit the links page to find information about Scottish research.



Saturday, November 12
First in, Last out: But What Came between 1914 and 1919?  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe DRive

Irene Ip’s father told her many stories about his life in the army, before and during the war, but she was too young to understand their context, and he died before she was ready to question him. When she decided to try to fill in the gap, she thought that she would have to rely on imagination, as the family had preserved so few letters and papers. As he had served in the Royal Field Artillery, which left no written account, she could not benefit from the many regimental histories that are now available. At first she searched through numerous histories for mentions of his brigade and battery but these were rare. Then, about five years ago, she realized that she also knew the division his brigade had been in. She Googled “The Fifth Division” and struck gold.  She was finally able to trace where her father had been for four and a half years. In her presentation, Irene will explain how she was able to fit the stories and few pieces of hard information into the broad context of the Division’s activity, as she tells the story of how her father came to be one of the few surviving “Old Contemptibles.” 

About the Speaker

Irene Kellow Ip spent many years writing books, research papers and articles as a professional economist but did not find the transition to writing family history an easy one, despite spending three years as Editor of Anglo-Celtic Roots. As a regular participant of the BIFHSGO Writing Group, she receives constructive criticism, encouragement and motivation to turn her family history into interesting stories she can share with her children, grandchildren and extended family.  She also contributes to Anglo-Celtic Roots and made a previous presentation to BIFHSGO.



Saturday, November 19
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Group)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Room 226, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. We all, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.
 
Visit the links page to find information about Scottish research.



Saturday, December 10
Great Moments in Genealogy with the Following Four Speakers:  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive Nepean, Ontario
Mary Ann Flannery—From Ireland You Say
By Duncan Monkhouse
This Great Moment will explore Duncan Monkhouse’s search for the ancestors of Mary Ann Flannery. The talk will start out with an explanation of how Mary Ann fits into Duncan’s family tree, where she lived and what her life was like. We will define the brick wall that initially inhibited locating any information about Mary Ann ancestors, how the wall was broken down, and what was located behind the wall.
 
About the Speaker
Duncan Monkhouse recently retired as an Investigator, Electronic Evidence Officer, for the Canadian Federal Government and in his spare time investigates his family’s history. Duncan’s interest in the family history was piqued in 2008 when his wife started researching her family. Fortunately, Duncan’s mother had worked on researching the family genealogy and had completed a large portion of the tree. By expanding the branches sideways and with the coming online of vast genealogical databases, Duncan was able to break down many brickwalls discovering new relatives and interesting lives.
 
The Drowning of Charles Dougherty
By Susan Davis
While perusing church records, Charles Dougherty’s name showed up as a witness to the baptism of one of Philip Thompson’s children. Within a few short years, the men’s name would show up again, this time for their funerals. The records indicated they both drowned 6 July 1901. Further research led to an article in The Sherbrooke Examiner. It reported that four men drown while crossing the St Francis River after a hard day’s work of log driving. Charles was 50 and left behind a large family in East Angus, Quebec, including Susan’s great grandmother.
 
About the Speaker
As an adolescent, Susan Davis volunteered at her local library. When returning books to their shelves, her two favourite sections were biographies and mysteries. Family history research provides her with lots of life stories to read and puzzles to solve. As the daughter of an army cook, Susan grew up loving her parents’ Eastern Townships of Quebec roots. Her dad still has her looking for the pirates in the family.
 
Extra! Extra! Read All about It! Cousin Lyman and Power of the Press
By Glenn Wright
We all recognize that newspapers are an essential source for family history, but very few of us can claim a newspaper editor in the family tree and the implications that this has for research. From the mid-1850s to 1934, Erastus Jackson (1829-1919) and his son Lyman (1856-1934) published and edited the Newmarket (Ontario) Era newspaper. Although some Wright family members lived in Newmarket for several years, the Jacksons, related through Erastus’s wife, Sophia Wright, frequently reported on the extended Wright family. Better still, detailed social news and notes, published in every edition over the course of several decades, solved long-standing research mysteries, proving again that newspapers can be an invaluable source of family information.
 
About the Speaker
Glenn Wright is Past President of the Society and has spoken on many occasions at our monthly meetings and at our annual conference. He has published widely in family history and genealogical magazines and journals and while his primary interest is Canadian participation in the Great War, he is determined to complete a history of his Wright and allied families. Glenn is a firm believer in the value of newspapers as a resource to assist us with our family history and with the social context in which our ancestors lived.
 
The Tender Tale of a First World War British War Baby with Canadian Roots, Discovered Almost a Century Later
By Suzanne Eakin
A short film (8.5 min.) documents the poignant story of Dave Travis, radio presenter for BBC, Essex, who finally found his paternal roots. In 2013, considering topics relevant to the upcoming centenary of the First World War, he casually suggested to Sarah Ensor, archivist at the Essex Record Office, that she try to uncover the identity of his paternal grandfather. All he knew was that he had been a Canadian airman, lost in action, prior to his father's birth in January 1917. To his utter astonishment and delight, Sarah promptly found his grandfather, announcing his name to Dave on his show, live, on air: Kenneth Mathewson, of Montreal. Sarah then tracked down the Mathewson family in Canada. A 100% DNA match ensued, as well as two trips to Canada by Dave and his wife Caroline to meet the Mathewson clan who have eagerly embraced this grandson of their family's beloved son, lost in the First World War a century ago.
 
About the Speaker
Suzanne Eakin (nee Mathewson) is a new member of BIFHSGO. A sixth generation Montrealer, she has a BA and Masters of Applied Science in clinical psychology from McGill. She worked in that field for over 3 decades, relocating to Halifax, NS in 1990 but then retiring in late 2009 to Ottawa where 2 of her 3 children and all 4 of her grandchildren reside. Her late father, Kenneth Black Mathewson, conducted family research for over 30 years, with great enthusiasm and persistence (as the pre-computer era of such pursuits required). Sue shares her father's love of family history, but takes particular pleasure in assembling historic family portraits and photographs, to supplement the 'who begat whom'. She looks forward to sharing the story of her family's newly discovered cousin Dave - the living legacy of their family's loss in the First World War. 
 
 



Saturday, January 14, 2017
Lanes, Trains & Parliament Hill  (Conference Planning Committee)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive Nepean, Ontario
By Marianne Rasmus
In the late 19th century, the Lane family was among the first to settle the community of Mission, BC which is located 80 km east of Vancouver on the north bank of the Fraser River. The Lanes loved to tell stories of these early times and had a great deal of pride in passing them down from one generation to the next. The family story that cemented Marianne Rasmus’s passion for family history research in the context of Canadian history is encapsulated in the story of Arthur Wellington Lane, who packed up his wife and three young children, left the familiarity of south-western Ontario, and headed west on the newly constructed CPR looking for new adventures and opportunities. It’s a story of perseverance and courage that has left a lasting legacy, and even includes a surprising discovery on Parliament Hill.
 
About the Speaker
Marianne Rasmus is relatively new to Ottawa, and was thrilled to discover BIFHSGO after moving here in 2013. Born and raised in Vancouver, she spent most of her life in BC, experiencing life on Vancouver Island, in BC’s north and in the Fraser Valley. While her husband’s career moved them around the province, Marianne worked in a variety of professional environments, and volunteered with various organizations. After reluctantly taking Canadian History as a “filler” course in college, she discovered an interest and passion for history she never expected. That interest took on new meaning when she began her family history journey in 2008, and came to understand the hardships and contributions of the people in both her and her husband’s family trees. Marianne and her husband, Bill, have been married for almost 33 years and have two sons and two granddaughters.