British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa
British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa
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Saturday, March 14
Ulster Historical Foundation Lecture Day (Special Event)  (Monthly Meeting)
9:00 am to 5:00 pm
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive, Nepean, Ontario
 
BIFHSGO is pleased to present the following day of lectures day by the Ulster Historical Foundation (UHF). The morning is free and is presented as part of our March BIFHSGO Monthly Meeting. The afternoon is offered for a fee of $10 per person. Tickets will be sold at the February Monthly Meetings and will also be for sale at the door on the day for as long as they last. Seating is limited, so purchase your tickets early.
 
The two speakers from UHF who will present lectures are Gillian Hunt and Fintan Mullan.
 
Here is the schedule for the day: (Information on the speakers and UHF follows the schedule.)
 
MORNING SESSION – Free as part of our March Monthly Meeting
 
9:00-9:30 am
Unique Challenges of Irish Genealogy: Pitfalls and Tricks of the Trade
Speaker: Gillian Hunt
This short presentation will focus on the particular and practical difficulties encountered when carrying out research into Irish ancestors as well as suggesting ways – key tips and tricks of the trade – to overcome these obstacles. We will also use this to highlight Irish record collections which have most recently become available online or through other media.
 
9:30-10:00 am
Discovery Tables with Gillian Hunt and Fintan Mullan
The speakers will have books for sale and various items on display.
 
10:00-10:15 am
President’s Welcome and Announcements by Barbara Tose
 
10:15-11:30 am
Records Related to the Different Churches in Ireland
Speaker: Gillian Hunt
This presentation will look at the different Church denominations in Ireland and how their varied histories have affected the types of records which exist for each one. We will then examine the main categories of Church records available for genealogical research, including the lesser known but no less useful sources such as vestry minute books. Finally we will focus on where these Church records are held and how to access them.
 
11:30 am – 1:00 pm
Lunch on your own (local eateries or bring a lunch. No lunch is provided)
 
AFTERNOON SESSION – $10 per head –Tickets are available for purchase at our January and February Monthly Meetings.
 
1:00-2:00 pm 
Census Substitutes and Other Sources for the Early Nineteenth and Eighteenth Century
Speaker: Fintan Mullan
Researchers can be left wondering what to do next when they have exhausted the possibilities of tithe applotment books, census fragments and church records for the early nineteenth century. This presentation provides some answers by drawing attention to census substitutes and other lesser known sources for the early nineteenth and eighteenth century, including: school records, 1796 flaxgrowers’ list, 1775 dissenter petitions, 1766 religious census, 1740 ‘Protestant Householders’ List and the Registry of Deeds, a significant, yet often overlooked, archive dating from 1708, which can provide invaluable information on Irish families of Anglican, Presbyterian and Catholic backgrounds.
 
2:00–3:00 pm            
Tracing Farming Families in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century: Using Landed Estate Records.
Speaker: Gillian Hunt
Estate papers are an important though hugely under-used source for Irish genealogical research. In many cases there are estate papers which survive from the 1700s and even the 1600s. In this presentation we will look at the different types of estate papers: leases, lease books, estate correspondence, even maps, and how they can help our research, and document rural Irish families in specific localities, even in the exact townland of our Irish ancestor. 
 
3:00-3:20 pm 
Afternoon Break
 
3:20-4:00 pm   
Understanding Irish Townlands: The Importance of Place, Identity and Administrative Divisions in Irish Research. Speaker: Fintan Mullan
The vastness of the North American continent can make it difficult to comprehend the very local and tightly-knit nature of Irish society. The sense of place in rural Ireland (irrespective of where) is massive, and understanding it can be crucial to success in Irish genealogy. This presentation explores the different administrative divisions: eg townland, barony, parish, Poor Law Union, etc, where they originated, how they relate to each other, and their importance in the historical records. Understanding Irish administrative divisions is not merely of value as a study in its own right, but can be fundamental in being really successful in our research. 
 
4.00-5.00 pm 
Solving Your Brick Walls: Practical Internet Tutorial and Resolving Research Problems
Facilitators: Gillian Hunt and Fintan Mullan
The speakers use online resources and their local knowledge to offer participants practical tips about Irish and Scots-Irish research. The session combines straight forward Q&A interspersed with searches in real time using a range of large and important online databases, for specific research queries submitted by the participants. These sessions will help the beginner and the seasoned genealogist alike. The presenters try to cover as much ground as they can to provide specific advice for the individual family historian on their research query.
 
About the speakers
Fintan Mullan has been Executive Director of Ulster Historical Foundation since 2001. With IT partners BRS Systems he pioneered the online births, deaths and marriages online record system for Antrim and Down, which led to www.rootsireland.ie, the Irish Family History Foundation’s unique database with over 20 million Irish historical records, making it the most useful online resource for Irish research. He has ensured the Foundation has been at the forefront of digital database developments for Irish genealogy. Fintan’s publishing experience is extensive, since 2001 he has managed the production of over 100 individual and diverse publications including the perennial favourite Researching Scots-Irish Ancestors. He is a non-executive director of the Irish Family History Foundation; sits on the board of, and is a member of the management committee of the Northern Ireland Publications Resource (NIPR), and a former member of the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, Readers Forum. He is a regular speaker on the North American circuit; having presented Irish and Scot-Irish programmes in most of the lower 48 states, and was one of the Northern Ireland presenters at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival July 2007. He has also spoken in Canada, the UK, Australia and New Zealand. He was educated at Queen’s University Belfast. He has a bachelor’s degree in Irish Politics and Philosophy, and a master’s degree in Organisation and Management, both from Queen’s University Belfast.
 
Gillian Hunt is Research Officer with the Ulster Historical Foundation and is responsible for the management of the Foundation's many genealogical activities. As well as managing the genealogy side of the Foundation's work, Gillian carries out research for clients and is a hugely experienced user of the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland and the General Register Office. She regularly teaches courses in Northern Ireland and gives talks on family history in the rest of Ireland, the UK and the USA. She has visited Stone Mountain Highland Games (Atlanta, GA) on a number of occasions and also presented at Tourism Ireland's 'Discover Northern Ireland' in Grand Central Terminal, NYC in 2010. For the past five years, she has taught a number of extra mural courses at Stranmillis College and at Queen's University, in Belfast, as well as to community groups across Northern Ireland. Gillian also speaks each year at the Pudsey Family History Fair in Leeds, England. Gillian has carried out the research for a number of television programmes, appearing in one which aired on BBCNI in 2010 and another which aired in autumn 2013. She has been with the Foundation since 2001, and received a degree in History (BA Hons, 1998) and a Masters in Historical Studies (MA, 2000) from the University of Wales, Aberystwyth.
 
About The Ulster Historical Foundation (www.ancestryireland.com)
Ulster Historical Foundation helps people to discover their Irish and Scots-Irish ancestors. They reconnect people with their family’s past in Ireland, and encourage them to participate in their Irish heritage and culture, both in the USA and Canada and by visiting and connecting with people in Ireland. They achieve this by providing a comprehensive, professional research service offering in-depth archival research; making available a huge range of online resources, including rich historical content and online birth/marriage/death databases; communicating with a worldwide membership organisation (our Guild); publishing interesting educational and genealogical books; and staging conferences, seminars and workshops at home and undertaking annual lecture tours in North America to promote Ireland’s history and heritage and encourage visitors to Ireland to enjoy roots-based tourism activities.
 
The Foundation is an educational non-profit organisation established in 1956 to promote interest in Irish genealogy and history, with particular reference to the historical nine county province of Ulster. They are a leading historical research agency and publishing house in Ireland. Since 2004 the Foundation has devised a series of ground breaking online historical and genealogical resources, which have helped to transform the availability of Irish records for family historians at home and abroad. In addition to their research expertise: knowing how to mine the archives and use the historical sources, they have always focused on connecting people to their ancestors and their ancestral homeland, as a real, living, enjoyable, rewarding and transformative experience.


Saturday, March 21
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Groups)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Room 226, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. We all, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.
 
Visit the links page to find information about Scottish research.


Saturday, March 21
BIFHSGO Writing Group  (Special Interest Groups)
11:30 am to 4:00 pm
Room 228, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
Open to BIFHSGO members who want feedback on writing their family history or memoirs, the Writing Group meets after the monthly BIFHSGO Saturday meetings with the exception of this meeting. We bring extra copies of our writing to share with members. Most of us also bring a lunch to eat before we begin our readings Our meetings usually end before 4:00 pm. For information, contact queries@bifhsgo.ca, attention Carol Annett.



Saturday, April 11
DNA 101  (Before BIFHSGO Education Talks)
9:00 am to 9:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive, Nepean, Ontario
 
Had your DNA done and still don't quite understand the results? Bill Arthurs will offer an understandable explanation of DNA for Genealogy, starting with basic knowledge of cell structure, the Y Chromosome and the X Chromosome. 
 
About the Speaker
Bill Arthurs has been researching his genealogy for many years — or as he says, "From BC until AD (from before computers until after DNA)." He has been mainly involved in a one-name study of the Titus surname, his mother’s maiden name, and now has more than 170,000 Titus related names in his database. He has also done research in plant biology with the Ottawa Orchid Society, which has made it relatively easy for him to adapt to the ongoing contribution of genetics to genealogical research. He has successfully used DNA  in researching both the Titus and Arthurs surnames. Bill is a longtime member of BIFHSGO, and currently chairs BIFHSGO’s DNA Special Interest Group.


Saturday, April 11 through Saturday, April 11
Sussex County, England  (Discovery Tables)
9:30 am to 10:00 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive, Nepean
 
Christine Jackson, John Sayers and Jane Down will jointly host a Discovery Table on Sussex County. They will all bring in items of interest, and here is your chance to ask questions about possibly anything about researching in Sussex, as well as the opportunity to meet other members of BIFHSGO who are also interested in research in this county. A great opportunity to network with society members who have a similar interest and perhaps to pick up some ideas about how to further your own research. If you are interested in Sussex, you will not want to miss this!


Saturday, April 11
My Ancestors were all “Ag Labs” — or were they?  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive, Nepean, Ontario
 
When Christine Jackson started researching her maternal grandmother’s family in West Sussex nearly 40 years ago, she had to use conventional tools on-site in England and printouts from the International Genealogical Index compiled by the Church of Latter-day Saints. Her efforts revealed a long but unexceptional line of agricultural labourers, reaching back to a brick wall in 1675. Many years later, Christine tackled that brick wall using a variety of online resources. Lacking key parish records, she accumulated what she calls ‘circumstantial evidence’ which also led her to a fascinating discovery. She learned about the skilled blast furnace workers, at least one of whom bore her family name, who migrated from Northern France in Tudor times to develop a new iron industry in the Weald of Sussex and Kent. In this presentation, Christine will recount her search for early genealogical evidence in a variety of lesser-known sources and for a possible link between that 16th-century immigrant French ironworker and her known 17th-century ancestors.
 
About the Speaker
Christine Jackson is a retired federal public servant (Elections Canada) and former freelance editor and writer. She has served on the BIFHSGO Board as publicity director and is a long-serving member of the conference planning committee. A keen family historian, she has made presentations, written articles for ACR, and has recently organized the 2014 BIFHSGO writing competitions. Born and raised in Brighton, in the English county of Sussex, Christine began researching her family history shortly after arriving in Canada in 1968. Three of her four grandparents spent their whole lives in different parts of Sussex. A long-term dream is to eventually find a common ancestral link between the families of two of them—one paternal and one maternal—who shared the same family name.
 


Saturday, April 11
BIFHSGO Writing Group  (Special Interest Groups)
11:30 am to 4:00 pm
Room 228, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
Open to BIFHSGO members who want feedback on writing their family history or memoirs, the Writing Group meets after the monthly BIFHSGO Saturday meetings with the exception of this meeting. We bring extra copies of our writing to share with members. Most of us also bring a lunch to eat before we begin our readings Our meetings usually end before 4:00 pm. For information, contact queries@bifhsgo.ca, attention Carol Annett.


Saturday, April 18
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Groups)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Room 226, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. We all, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.
 
Visit the links page to find information about Scottish research.



Saturday, May 9
Member Access to the BIFHSGO website  (Before BIFHSGO Education Talks)
9:00 am to 9:30 am
101 Centrepointe Dr. Ben Franklin Place, Nepean, Ontario
 
Brian Glenn and Kathy Wallace will demonstrate a variety of functions of the BIFHSGO website, including logging on to the Members Only section; changing your password; reviewing your personal contact information; renewing your membership online (if available); and registering for the annual conference online.Afterward, during the break, Brian will be available in the foyer to assist anyone with Members Only Login issues or questions about the online registration system.
 
About the Speakers
Kathy Wallace joined BIFHSGO in 2005 and is currently Membership Director. She was Editor of the BIFHSGO ENews for a few years and has been part of the Conference Planning Committee handling the roles of Welcome Desk Coordinator, Registrar and Secretary over the years.Brian has been a BIFHSGO member for many years serving on the Board in the Education and Research portfolios and has made numerous presentations to the membership over the years. 
 
Brian Glenn has been involved with the BIFHSGO web site for several years introducing a number of features such as the podcasts, CanadaHelps donation link, the Store function for Publications and has been responsible for the online conference registration since 2008. This year he has been working with the website developer to initiate a new and more inclusive online registration system for the fall conference.


Saturday, May 9
Invisible but Audible: Postwar English Immigrants in Canada  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive, Nepean, Ontario
 
Marilyn Barber and Murray Watson will talk about the findings in their new book about English-born immigrants who settled in Canada in the thirty years after the end of World War II. Surprisingly the English as an immigrant group has largely failed to attract the attention of scholars. The talk will explore some of the book's themes which include an exploration of why people chose to emigrate and why come to Canada, an examination of the complex process of settling in, creating a home, coping with family separation, finding work and building a career. How too did these new migrants reconstruct their sense of personal and national identities in a Canada that was shedding its notions of British heritage to become the multicultural Canada of today?
 
About the Speakers
Marilyn Barber lives in Ottawa and is an adjunct research professor in the department of history at Carleton University. She recently retired from a position as associate professor in the department but continues to supervise graduate students and teach some courses in the fields of Canadian history, women’s and gender history. Her research interests focus on immigration to Canada from the late nineteenth century. She is researching and writing about female domestic servants who migrated to Canada from Britain and continental Europe, and about an Anglican organization, The Fellowship of the Maple Leaf, that sent British teachers, doctors and nurses, and women church workers to the Canadian prairies and the northern Peace River district in the interwar period. Barber’s ancestors emigrated to Canada from England in the 1830s. 
 
Murray Watson is an honorary research fellow at the University of Dundee where he gained his PhD in 2003 for his work The Invisible Diaspora: The English in Scotland 1945 to 2000. This was revised and published by Edinburgh University Press in the same year under the title Being English in Scotland. Watson currently lives in his native Scotland but makes annual trips to Canada to work on research into English migration to Canada as well as fulfilling temporary teaching assignments at Carleton University. Prior to gaining his PhD Watson owned and ran a successful advertising agency advising multinational IT companies. Watson is happily married with three children and three grand children. His mother became a landed immigrant in her 70th year settling in British Columbia. 
 


Saturday, May 9
BIFHSGO Writing Group  (Special Interest Groups)
11:30 am to 4:00 pm
Room 228, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
Open to BIFHSGO members who want feedback on writing their family history or memoirs, the Writing Group meets after the monthly BIFHSGO Saturday meetings with the exception of this meeting. We bring extra copies of our writing to share with members. Most of us also bring a lunch to eat before we begin our readings Our meetings usually end before 4:00 pm. For information, contact queries@bifhsgo.ca, attention Carol Annett.


Saturday, May 23
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Groups)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Room 226, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. We all, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.
 
Visit the links page to find information about Scottish research.


Saturday, May 30
DNA Interest Group  (Special Interest Groups)
9:30 am to 12:00 pm
Room 226, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
Members meet quarterly to share experiences, information and ideas about the use of DNA evidence in exploring family history. Attendees will be required to sign in and out at the reception desk on the ground floor.
 
Visit the DNA Information, DNA Database Sites, and Special Interest Groups page for more information
 



Saturday, June 13
Genealogy at the Ottawa Public Library  (Discovery Tables)
9:30 am to 10:00 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive, Nepean
Patricia Barlosky, Genealogy Librarian at the Neapean Centrepoint Branch of the Ottawa Public Library will share information about the print and microfilm resources available at the Ottawa Public Library for genealogy and history research.


Saturday, June 13
Great Moments in Genealogy with the following Speakers  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive, Nepean, Ontario
 
Elizabeth White, Elizabeth Dwight or Elizabeth Jones? Mother of 39 and My 8x Great-Grandmother
By Tara Grant
When Tara Grant first started researching her family history her grandmother told her that they were descended from the Greenhills. The Greenhill family had a famous ancestress who was reputed to have had 39 children, 7 boys and 32 girls, all single births save one. Intrigued Tara started researching in order to determine if the story was true. Magazine articles written in the 19th c. identified her 8x great-grandmother as either Elizabeth White daughter of William White, Elizabeth Dwight daughter of William Dwight, or Elizabeth Jones daughter of John Jones. Elizabeth married William Greenhill of Abbots Langley, Hertford. While Tara was unable to confirm the births of 39 children, she was able to sort out the identity of Elizabeth Greenhill and some of her intriguing and complicated family lineage.
 
About the Speaker
Tara Grant works as an archaeological conservator for the Canadian Conservation Institute (Dept. of Canadian Heritage). She specializes in the conservation of freshly excavated Thule artifacts from the Arctic and waterlogged cedar baskets from BC. She has been researching her family history for about 20 years. A lover of jigsaw puzzles, she finds family history to be incredibly similar - connecting small fragments together to form a picture. She is hoping her family jigsaw has all the pieces. Recent forays into DNA research shows 94% of her DNA comes from the British Isles so she has joined the correct family history society.
 
 
Misplaced Twigs on a Branch
By Ken McKinlay
How many of you have inherited a hand-drawn family tree from a relative? What do you do when the facts you have discovered don't match up to the tree on that piece of paper? Well Ken McKinlay received several hand-written family trees when he was first starting out in his journey and after more than 15 years he is finally getting around to reviewing those other branches. This is the somewhat confusing tale of Louisa and Marjory and working through the records to uncover their parents to figure out how they really fit into the McKinnon-McDonald family tree.
 
About the Speaker
Ken McKinlay, a genealogy researcher with over 15 years experience, is a frequent speaker at Ottawa area events. Ken, popular for his practically-oriented talks on genealogy resources and research techniques, blogs at Family Tree Knots.
 
 
Digging Up the Bownes in My Family Tree
By Lesley Anderson
Could an electrical storm, pregnancy and even a man-made reservoir stop her from finding her 3rd great grandparents farm? Lesley Anderson has been tracing her family tree since she was a teenager and bolstered by her successful visit to find her Platts farm outside of Chesterfield, Derbyshire, she was determined to find her Crofts/Bowne's farm. After researching in the County Records Office she and her mother's friend go on a journey to find whether it was still standing.  
 
About the Speaker
Lesley Anderson has been involved in the personal research of her family tree for over 40 years and her passion for genealogy has branched out to teaching classes, speaking at seminars and conferences, consulting and doing research for others. She is well known for her computer and genealogy classes offered through the Ottawa Catholic Board Continuing Ed and her “field trips” to various archives and libraries. She was the Director of Education for BIFHSGO and volunteers at the Ottawa Stake - LDS Family History Center where she gets great enjoyment out of helping new and experienced genealogists with their research. Lesley has worked for Ancestry.ca for 7 years in her role as Partnership Development and Content Specialist and has done numerous presentations at Ontario Genealogy Society branch meetings and conferences across Canada as well as TV and Radio appearances.
 
 
Tragedy at Sea: How My Family History Nearly Ended Before It Began
By John Reid
Churchill called the second half of 1940 the darkest hour when the British Empire stood alone again Nazi Germany. All out fighting was raging, civilians were in harm’s way. At the beginning of August, the 825-ton Irish-registered steamer Kerry Head, captained by John Reid’s father's uncle, Charles Drummond, was bombed, but not sunk, in Irish territorial waters by a German plane. That's despite Ireland being neutral. In early September, the 16,700 ton RMS Rangitane, on which John’s father, Charles Reid, was ninth engineer, set sail from Liverpool for New Zealand. It was promptly recalled when the journey was considered too hazardous for children following the tragedy of the torpedoing of the City of Benares and the death of 77 child evacuees. This presentation relates how, before the year was through, both the Kerry Head and the Rangitane were at the bottom of the ocean due to enemy action.
 
About the Speaker
Following a career as a PhD research scientist, John Reid stepped up his interest in family and local history, joining the board of the British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa (BIFHSGO) and serving as president from 2004 to 2006. His blog, Canada's Anglo-Celtic Connections, has had over 6,000 postings since March 2006. In addition to numerous scientific publications, he is author of Researching Canada`s Home Children, editor of The Ottawa Sharpshooters, author of articles in several newsstand magazines, a regular columnist in BIFHSGO's quarterly chronicle, and speaker on various family history topics.
 
 


Saturday, June 13
BIFHSGO Writing Group  (Special Interest Groups)
11:30 am to 4:00 pm
Room 228, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
Open to BIFHSGO members who want feedback on writing their family history or memoirs, the Writing Group meets after the monthly BIFHSGO Saturday meetings with the exception of this meeting. We bring extra copies of our writing to share with members. Most of us also bring a lunch to eat before we begin our readings Our meetings usually end before 4:00 pm. For information, contact queries@bifhsgo.ca, attention Carol Annett.



Saturday, September 12
The Life and Times of Nursing Sister Laura Gamble, WWI  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive, Nepean, Ontario
 
Fairbairn House Museum in Wakefield and Theatre Wakefield are collaborating to create content for museum displays. The same materials will be used for theatrical productions. A group of seniors was formed to research local history and with the help of professionals, scripts were written. Brooke Broadbent will explain his research into the life of Laura Gamble, a nursing sister from the First World War who came from Wakefield. He will discuss sources used and what he discovered about the Gamble family. He will examine the dramatic elements in her life that are being used for the museum displays and the theatrical production.  He will explain some of the resources that are available from the Gatineau Valley Historical Society.
 
About the Speaker
Brooke Broadbent studied and taught Canadian history. He has researched parts of his family history and with the help of the Trent Valley Archives in Peterborough Ontario he self-published a book which uses historical fiction to fill in the gaps about his ancestors who settled in the Peterborough area in the 1850s.
 
 


Saturday, September 19
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Groups)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Room 226, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. We all, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.
 
Visit the links page to find information about Scottish research.



Saturday, October 10
Did DNA Prove the Skeleton under the Leicester Car Park was Richard III?  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive, Nepean, Ontario
 
In 1485 the body of King Richard III, killed at the Battle of Bosworth Field, was taken to nearby Leicester and, after public display, was hastily buried in the medieval church of Gray Friars. Over the years the exact grave location and fate of the remains were lost to history. An archaeological excavation in 2012 revealed a skeleton. Initially cautious in their conclusions, examination by the University of Leicester research team eventually led them to conclude that the evidence for the remains being those of Richard III is overwhelming. This presentation by John Reid reviews the forensic evidence examined by the team, focuses on their use of likelihood ratios for non-genetic and genetic data for making the case and draws out lessons for genealogists.
 
About the Speaker
Following a career as a PhD research scientist, John Reid stepped up his interest in family and local history joining the board of the British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa (BIFHSGO), serving as President from 2004 to 2006. His blog, Canada's Anglo-Celtic Connections, has over 6,000 postings since March 2006. In addition to numerous scientific publications he is author of Researching Canada`s Home Children, editor of The Ottawa Sharpshooters, author of articles in several newsstand magazines, a regular columnist in BIFHSGO's quarterly chronicle and speaker on topics in family history.


Saturday, October 17
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Groups)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Room 226, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. We all, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.
 
Visit the links page to find information about Scottish research.



Saturday, November 14
The George Gallie Nasmith World War I Letters-A Scavenger Hunt & a Not So Great Moment in Genealogy  (Monthly Meeting)
10:00 am to 11:30 am
The Chamber, Ben Franklin Place, 101 Centrepointe Drive, Nepean, Ontario
 
About 20 years ago, Patty McGregor’s mother bought a box of approximately 275 letters at an auction sale. The letters were to and from Lieutenant Colonel (later Colonel) George Gallie Nasmith of Toronto, who went overseas in 1914 with the First Canadian Contingent as the "Water Specialist." The collection includes letters to George from his siblings, his fiancée and his friends – and from him to them. This talk discusses the adventure of reading and transcribing all the letters and identifying and researching the letter writers and the events and people mentioned. Genealogical research involved BMD and census records as well as military files, maps, historical newspapers and estate files. The final challenge was in deciding how best to share the contents of the letters. Therein lies the rub.
 
About the Speaker
Patty McGregor retired from the federal government in 2013. She has been researching her family for over 25 years. She has spoken on several occasions at BIFHSGO Great Moments events and has had articles printed in Anglo-Celtic Roots and OGS’ Families. She is the author of Don’t Forget to Write – a look at the Canadian YMCA through historical postcards, and Researching Canadian Immigration Records. She and her husband have been involved in the antiques and collectibles business for 35 years and many of you will recognize her as a vendor at various genealogy conferences where she sells used and out of print books. 


Saturday, November 21
Scottish Genealogy Group  (Special Interest Groups)
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Room 226, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
Are you interested in your Scottish roots? In discovering who your Scottish ancestors were and how they lived? The Scottish Genealogy Group is made up of people who share these interests. At our informal meetings we share information and resources and discuss our successes and our brick walls. We all, beginners and experts alike, learn from and encourage each other.
 
Visit the links page to find information about Scottish research.


Saturday, November 28
DNA Interest  (Special Interest Groups)
9:30 am to 12:00 pm
Room 226, City of Ottawa Archives, 100 Tallwood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario
Members meet quarterly to share experiences, information and ideas about the use of DNA evidence in exploring family history. Attendees will be required to sign in and out at the reception desk on the ground floor.
 
Visit the DNA Information, DNA Database Sites, and Special Interest Groups page for more information